How do innovations spread?

Atul Gawande raises a very interesting question in his recent piece in The New Yorker. The question is, why do some innovations spread so swiftly and others so slowly? He compares two innovations that arose at similar times, surgical anaesthesia and antiseptics. They both were invented in the mid 1800s, in established centres of medical […]

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Sociology of ideas

Related to my previous post, this was in my inbox today (thanks to ACM TechNews): Computers Intersect With Sociology to Sift Through ‘All Our Ideas’ Princeton University (07/19/10) Emery, Chris Princeton University researchers have developed a new way for organizations to solicit ideas from large groups and to have them vote on the merit of […]

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Dunbar’s number

Dunbar’s number is a suggested cognitive limit to the number of people with whom one can maintain stable social relationships. These are relationships in which an individualknows who each person is and how each person relates to every other person.[1][2][3][4][5][6] This number was first proposed in the 1990s by British anthropologist Robin Dunbar, who found […]

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Self-verification

Self-verification is a social psychological theory that asserts people want to be known and understood by others according to their firmly held beliefs and feelings about themselves, that is self-views (including self-concepts and self-esteem). A competing theory to self-verification is self-enhancement or the drive for positive evaluations. Because chronic self-concepts and self-esteem play an important […]

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