Scientists for EU Letter

If you are in the UK, you know about the intense ongoing debate regarding the referendum on whether to leave the EU. Scientists for EU has organised a letter that represents the view of many in the UK scientific community, which you might consider adding your support to: http://scientistsforeu.uk/sign-save-science/. The core argument being put forth is […]

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Keeping libel laws out of science

I just came to know about a dispute wherein the British Chiropractic Association has sued Simon Singh for libel, because he wrote about the lack of an evidence-based methodology in certain chiropractic treatments. You can read the full story here: http://www.senseaboutscience.org.uk/index.php/site/project/333. I encourage you to understand what is at stake here and consider signing this […]

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Turing Apology – Official Response

This morning, I received the following response to the petition mentioned in my previous post: Prime Minister: 2009 has been a year of deep reflection – a chance for Britain, as a nation, to commemorate the profound debts we owe to those who came before. A unique combination of anniversaries and events have stirred in […]

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Turing Apology

A colleague sent me this:http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/8226509.stmhttp://petitions.number10.gov.uk/turing/ The petition reads: We the undersigned petition the Prime Minister to apologize for the prosecution of Alan Turing that led to his untimely death. More information on this petition: Alan Turing was the greatest computer scientist ever born in Britain. He laid the foundations of computing, helped break the Nazi […]

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Thermoeconomics

Thermoeconomics, also referred to as biophysical economics, is a school of heterodox economics that applies the laws of thermodynamics to economic theory.[1] The term “thermoeconomics” was coined in 1962 by American engineer Myron Tribus,[2][3][4]Thermoeconomics can be thought of as the statistical physics of economic value. Thermoeconomics is based on the proposition that the role of […]

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Systems thinking

Systems thinking involves the use of various techniques to study systems of many kinds. In nature, examples of the objects of systems thinking include ecosystems – in which various elements (such as air, water, movement, plants, and animals) interact. In organizations, systems consist of people, structures, and processes that operate together to make an organization “healthy” […]

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Dunbar’s number

Dunbar’s number is a suggested cognitive limit to the number of people with whom one can maintain stable social relationships. These are relationships in which an individualknows who each person is and how each person relates to every other person.[1][2][3][4][5][6] This number was first proposed in the 1990s by British anthropologist Robin Dunbar, who found […]

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Instrumental rationality

Instrumental rationality is a mode of thought and action that identifies problems and works directly towards their solution.[1] Instrumental rationality is often studied as a social phenomenon by sociology, social philosophy and critical theory. Its proponents appear to work largely without reference to the school Instrumentalism, with which it is so closely associated linguistically. Perhaps […]

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a transition to decarbonization

A ‘perfect’ agreement in Paris is not essential Success at the latest climate talks will be a recognition by the world’s nations that incremental change will not do the job, says Johan Rockström. 25 November 2015 It would be dangerous to allow ‘success’ to be reduced to a low level of political achievement so that […]

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