English-Japanese Neural Machine Translation with Encoder-Decoder-Reconstructor

Introduction Neural Machine Translation has gained much momentum these days. It has greatly improved from the traditional statistical machine translation, and achieved state-of-the-art performance on translation tasks within many languages. However, NMT suffers from both over-translation and under-translation problems, that is to say, sometimes it may repeatedly translate words, while sometimes it may miss some […]

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Relearn the Linguistic World in “Arrival”: An Interview with Jessica Coon

In the movie Arrival, language is one of the most powerful weapons. On top of that, the film’s consultant, Jessica Coon, believes that language is its own origin; that language originates from itself. Jessica Coon is Associate Professor of linguistics at McGill University, Canada Research Chair in Syntax and Indigenous Languages, and linguistics expert in […]

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rongorongo

The Bishop questioned the Rapanui wise man, Ouroupano Hinapote, the son of the wise man Tekaki [who said that] he, himself, had begun the requisite studies and knew how to carve the characters with a small shark’s tooth. He said that there was nobody left on the island who knew how to read the characters […]

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Memory

Published on May 16, 2013 The possibility that our personal memory can play strange tricks on us has been the focus of Giuliana’s research for many years. Her work, based at the University of Hull, has also examined the cognitive and behavioural consequences of suggestion. Giuliana is a recognised memory expert and has recently been […]

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The language of lying — Noah Zandan

Sources Meta-analysishttp://smg.media.mit.edu/library/DePa… Published on Nov 3, 2014 View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-languag… We hear anywhere from 10 to 200 lies a day. And although we’ve spent much of our history coming up with ways to detect these lies by tracking physiological changes in their tellers, these methods have proved unreliable. Is there a more direct approach? […]

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Dunbar’s number

Dunbar’s number is a suggested cognitive limit to the number of people with whom one can maintain stable social relationships. These are relationships in which an individualknows who each person is and how each person relates to every other person.[1][2][3][4][5][6] This number was first proposed in the 1990s by British anthropologist Robin Dunbar, who found […]

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Linguistics as a Window to Understanding the Brain

The ability to communicate through spoken language may be the trait that best sets humans apart from other animals. Last year researchers identified the first gene implicated in the ability to speak. This week, a team shows that the human version of this gene appears to date back no more than 200,000 years–about the time […]

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Chimpanzee Genome Project

The Chimpanzee Genome Project is an effort to determine the DNA sequence of the Chimpanzee genome. It is expected that by comparing the genomes of humans and other apes, it will be possible to better understand what makes humans distinct from other species from a genetic perspective. Human and chimpanzee chromosomes are very similar. The […]

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Mikhail Mikhailovich Bakhtin

Mikhail Mikhailovich Bakhtin (/bɑːkˈtiːn, bɑːx–/;[2]Russian: Михаи́л Миха́йлович Бахти́н, pronounced [mʲɪxɐˈil mʲɪˈxajləvʲɪtɕ bɐxˈtʲin]; 17 November 1895 – 7 March [3] 1975) was a Russian philosopher, literary critic, semiotician[4] and scholar who worked on literary theory, ethics, and the philosophy of language. His writings, on a variety of subjects, inspired scholars working in a number of different traditions […]

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