Thermoeconomics

Thermoeconomics, also referred to as biophysical economics, is a school of heterodox economics that applies the laws of thermodynamics to economic theory.[1] The term “thermoeconomics” was coined in 1962 by American engineer Myron Tribus,[2][3][4]Thermoeconomics can be thought of as the statistical physics of economic value. Thermoeconomics is based on the proposition that the role of […]

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Freeman Dyson: Heretical Thoughts About Science and Society

Freeman Dyson with dry wit and self-effacing good humor explains that by heretical he means ideas that go against prevailing dogmas, and that in his self-appointed role as heretic, he is unimpressed by conventional wisdom. Hosted by Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future on November 1, 2005. Advertisements

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Systems thinking

Systems thinking involves the use of various techniques to study systems of many kinds. In nature, examples of the objects of systems thinking include ecosystems – in which various elements (such as air, water, movement, plants, and animals) interact. In organizations, systems consist of people, structures, and processes that operate together to make an organization “healthy” […]

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Behavioral economics

Behavioral economics, along with the related sub-field behavioral finance, studies the effects of psychological, social, cognitive, and emotional factors on the economicdecisions of individuals and institutions and the consequences for market prices, returns, and resource allocation, although not always that narrowly, but also more generally, of the impact of different kinds of behavior, in different […]

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STEM

Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM, previously SMET) is an acronym that refers to the academic disciplines of science[note 1], technology, engineeringand mathematics.[1] The term is typically used when addressing education policy and curriculum choices in schools to improve competitiveness in science and technology development. It has implications for workforce development, national security concerns and […]

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Dunbar’s number

Dunbar’s number is a suggested cognitive limit to the number of people with whom one can maintain stable social relationships. These are relationships in which an individualknows who each person is and how each person relates to every other person.[1][2][3][4][5][6] This number was first proposed in the 1990s by British anthropologist Robin Dunbar, who found […]

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The middle income trap

The middle income trap is a theorized economic development situation, where a country which attains a certain income (due to given advantages) will get stuck at that level.[1]The concept was coined in 2007.[2] A country in the middle income trap will have lost their competitive edge in the exportation of manufactured goods because their wages […]

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adult human biomass

Research article The weight of nations: an estimation of adult human biomass Sarah Catherine Walpole1*, David Prieto-Merino2, Phil Edwards2, John Cleland2, Gretchen Stevens3 and Ian Roberts2 *Corresponding author: Sarah C Walpole argotomunky@yahoo.co.uk Author Affiliations 1Foundation Year 2 doctor, North Yorkshire and East Coast deanery, 4 Hilton Place, Leeds, LS8 4HE, UK 2Faculty of Epidemiology and […]

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Jevons paradox

In economics, the Jevons paradox (/ˈdʒɛvənz/; sometimes Jevons effect) occurs when technological progress increases the efficiency with which a resource is used (reducing the amount necessary for any one use), but the rate of consumption of that resource rises because of increasing demand.[1] The Jevons paradox is perhaps the most widely known paradox in ecological […]

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